Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
STATION
CNNW 7
CNN 2
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNN
Dec 5, 2012 1:00pm PST
in the '90s with billi bill clinton. listen to what he says about the fiscal cliff? >> i think no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less dangerous than letting things build up for a year or two. the president has staked out a position of nonseriousness, i think it's difficult for the house republicans right now to find any practical way to get his attention. >> he's saying go over the cliff rather than accept what the president wants right now. >> i don't need to remind you this is the house speaker who shut down the government and that didn't work so well for the republicans. going over the cliff is something i don't think they want to do earlier. as i keep saying, wolf. the irony to me here is that the larger issues are things they really understand how to resolve, if you look at all their proposals. they just can't get there, because they can't agree on this revenue issue. where does the revenue come from. do you raise the rates on the wealthy? if you do, how much? and that's actually in the whole realm of things a sticking point that one would presume
CNN
Dec 3, 2012 1:00pm PST
that rate to 39.6% where it was during the clinton administration. what else is in this new gop proposal? >> reporter: let's show you some of the savings when it comes to government spending. first of all, they put about $600 billion in what the republicans are calling health savings. we understand -- we don't have details. we understand much of that comes from medicare, things that we've heard from republicans over and over like raising the eligibility age, means testing, things like that. so then we have about $600 billion in essentially spending cuts, half from mandatory spending, half from discretionary spending. this is the other very interesting thing that's new. $200 billion from revising the consumer price index. that sounds very technical. but it has very real world consequences because it very much could affect the money, the checks that social security recipients in particular get every single month because it effectively changes inflation so it changes the formula from what they would get. >> significant differences between the white house proposal on this part of the equatio
CNN
Dec 6, 2012 4:00pm EST
very careful not to say we have to go up to the clinton-era 39.6%. he hasn't used that number. and so he's -- you know -- >> right now it's 35%. >> right now it's 35%. so if you look in the middle, okay, 37% is a real possibility. but here's the caveat. john boehner, the house speaker, cannot take a rate increase to his caucus unless it is accompanied by some signal of real entitlement cuts. something that they do now and give a down payment on for the future. i don't think you get -- could get rates through unless the president gave a little bit. and if you look at the document from the grand bargain back in july of 2011, the president was willing to give on that. so we'll have to see if they can get back to that. but again, has to be one significant item that they know they'll be able to build upon in the future. an item from both sides. >> neither side's going to be thrilled. but they've got to compromise. >> that's the way life usually works, doesn't it? >> certainly does. thank you. >>> meanwhile, huge announcement today on capitol hill. the conservative senator jim demint of sou
CNN
Nov 30, 2012 1:00pm PST
at something that might look like the clinton coalitions, which is that the leader of each party, the president and john boehner, might have to take not a majority of his own party, but less than that and come together to forge some kind of a deal. i may be living in a dream world, but i think that's within the realm of the doable. >> we also have this issue of negotiation by public appearance. john boehner versus the president of the united states. and we want to just look at the sound bites from today and talk about how much of this is posturing and how much of this is sort of revealing a bottom line. let's listen. >> when i came out the day after the election and make it clear that republicans will put revenue on the table, i took a great risk. and then the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal. and they send one up here that calls for $1.6 trillion in new taxes, calls for a little -- not even $400 billion in cuts, and they want to have this extra spending that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it was not a serious proposal. and so right
CNN
Nov 29, 2012 1:00pm PST
. right now the top rate as you know is 35%. it was 39.6%, jessica, during the clinton administration. now there's some suggestion what if they compromise, have it go up to 36% or 37%, is that something you're hearing the white house would potentially be open to? not 39.6% but maybe 37%? >> reporter: this seems like an area, yes, for wiggle room, wolf. not because they say so, but because of what they won't say. when we asked that question, the white house does not say that it must only go back up to that high clinton rate. and so it seems that there could be some flexibility in how high -- what level it has to go back to. >> yeah. and that would be for those earning more than $250,000 a year. jessica, thanks very much. we're also learning more about what president obama and mitt romney talks about over lunch at the white house this afternoon. our national political correspondent jim acosta's getting some details. they also released the menu of what they were eating. but give us the substance. >> that's right. turkey chili was on the menu. perhaps thanksgiving leftovers. i talked to a repu
CNN
Dec 4, 2012 1:00pm PST
.6% rate of the clinton years? he did not. so is there a little give ultimately to sort of say what if it doesn't go up to 39.6%, but say 37%, is that something the white house would accept? also, this that same interview, the president raised the possibility, which is that after you do tax reform and you close loopholes and deductions, that if the rate is raised, the top rate, there's always a possibility that after you do tax reform, of course, the top rate would then go down again. so it was -- you have to listen to the president very carefully to see where there might be some give. the problem from my point of view is that everybody knows what's got to be done in the long-term. it's the question of the short-term deal. >> john boehner, speaker of the house, he came up with a proposal. but not all the conservatives in the house and the senate are on board. jim demint, republican senator from south carolina. >> this is a time to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us. his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table un
CNN
Dec 1, 2012 3:00pm PST
with a tax rate for those at the top that is higher than it is now, but lower than it was under bill clinton. it's going to be messy getting there, but a higher rate for those at the top seems to be an inevitable outcome of this. >> speaking of messy, the progressives love to get on the bandwagon on that one issue. what are they going to do when the president starts moving against entitlements? >> well, you know, what's interesting on that, republicans gambled and lost, i think in the summer of 2011, president obama showed willingness to go much further on entitlements than he is today. he'll end up going further on a deal than he is now. but not as far as he would have then. he will have to confront his party. that's part of the definition of being president, saying no to your own side. there's a case to be made to liberals, if you do not constrain entitlements in the long run. what you're doing is squeezing all the discretionary investment s. there's a case for controlling the entitlement spending. the republicans gambled and lost during the debt ceiling talks of 2011. >> let's leave it th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)